CLIENT:  Confidential   LOCATION : Robert's Creek, Vancouver, Canada   AREA:  5700 Sqft   COMPLETED:  2009   PROGRAM:  Art Collector Weekend Residence   CONTRACTOR : Northwest Contracting:  Allan May    INTERIOR DESIGN:  Paul Conder   IMAGES BY:  Roger Brooks
       
     
 Inspired by the Villa concept, the Roberts Creek Village is a house for Art and Living that asks the question: Can a house be organic and urban at the same time? 
       
     
  Urban in its massing, the house reflects a merging in lifestyles between city and country, inside and outside, organic and machine.    
       
     
 Motivated by the clients love and appreciation for contemporary and traditional art (First Nations and Contemporary Canadian Art) the house, a conceptual Longhouse, has been re-configured to the site and needs of the clients with totems celebrating the point of entry in compression, fireplaces commanding the “spiritual center” of the house and free flowing open plan to promote community.
       
     
8.jpg
       
     
  In order to heighten the site’s natural beauty the house was positioned at the edge of the bluff enhancing the views to the east, south and west and allowing the inhabitants to hear the nearby creek, which runs throughout the property.
       
     
  Large expanses of glasses are positioned on the south side of the house to help gain heat in the winter and natural ventilation in the summer.
       
     
   
  
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  However, maximizing the views posed a challenge due to the Clients need for walls and display space. The result was to create axis with views out to the landscape, and treat the circulation spaces as “galleries".
       
     
_MG_0719.jpg
       
     
6.jpg
       
     
  Materials such as Western Red Cedar, Douglas Fir, and Black Slate were chosen in order to contextualize the region and merge old and new building methods.    
       
     
  Using a palette of volumes, walls, and materials the house was designed using 5 different sliding applications; splicing traditional and contemporary textures while reflecting the natural environment, and transforming the house into a sculptural object.
       
     
  The interiors are designed to connect the interior to the exterior. Large columns support large expanses of roof to mimic the trees and their horizontal canopies, slate walls carry through the house from interior to exterior and back out again, and water flows from a man made creek up and around the house.        
       
     
_MG_1047.jpg
       
     
_MG_1107.jpg
       
     
roof plan.jpg
       
     
1st floor.jpg
       
     
2nd Floor.jpg
       
     
M robertson creek section [Converted].jpg
       
     
section house close up.jpg
       
     
  CLIENT:  Confidential   LOCATION : Robert's Creek, Vancouver, Canada   AREA:  5700 Sqft   COMPLETED:  2009   PROGRAM:  Art Collector Weekend Residence   CONTRACTOR : Northwest Contracting:  Allan May    INTERIOR DESIGN:  Paul Conder   IMAGES BY:  Roger Brooks
       
     

CLIENT: Confidential

LOCATION: Robert's Creek, Vancouver, Canada

AREA: 5700 Sqft

COMPLETED: 2009

PROGRAM: Art Collector Weekend Residence

CONTRACTOR: Northwest Contracting: Allan May

INTERIOR DESIGN: Paul Conder

IMAGES BY: Roger Brooks

 Inspired by the Villa concept, the Roberts Creek Village is a house for Art and Living that asks the question: Can a house be organic and urban at the same time? 
       
     

Inspired by the Villa concept, the Roberts Creek Village is a house for Art and Living that asks the question: Can a house be organic and urban at the same time? 

  Urban in its massing, the house reflects a merging in lifestyles between city and country, inside and outside, organic and machine.    
       
     

Urban in its massing, the house reflects a merging in lifestyles between city and country, inside and outside, organic and machine.

 

 Motivated by the clients love and appreciation for contemporary and traditional art (First Nations and Contemporary Canadian Art) the house, a conceptual Longhouse, has been re-configured to the site and needs of the clients with totems celebrating the point of entry in compression, fireplaces commanding the “spiritual center” of the house and free flowing open plan to promote community.
       
     

Motivated by the clients love and appreciation for contemporary and traditional art (First Nations and Contemporary Canadian Art) the house, a conceptual Longhouse, has been re-configured to the site and needs of the clients with totems celebrating the point of entry in compression, fireplaces commanding the “spiritual center” of the house and free flowing open plan to promote community.

8.jpg
       
     
  In order to heighten the site’s natural beauty the house was positioned at the edge of the bluff enhancing the views to the east, south and west and allowing the inhabitants to hear the nearby creek, which runs throughout the property.
       
     

In order to heighten the site’s natural beauty the house was positioned at the edge of the bluff enhancing the views to the east, south and west and allowing the inhabitants to hear the nearby creek, which runs throughout the property.

  Large expanses of glasses are positioned on the south side of the house to help gain heat in the winter and natural ventilation in the summer.
       
     

Large expanses of glasses are positioned on the south side of the house to help gain heat in the winter and natural ventilation in the summer.

   
  
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  However, maximizing the views posed a challenge due to the Clients need for walls and display space. The result was to create axis with views out to the landscape, and treat the circulation spaces as “galleries".
       
     

However, maximizing the views posed a challenge due to the Clients need for walls and display space. The result was to create axis with views out to the landscape, and treat the circulation spaces as “galleries".

_MG_0719.jpg
       
     
6.jpg
       
     
  Materials such as Western Red Cedar, Douglas Fir, and Black Slate were chosen in order to contextualize the region and merge old and new building methods.    
       
     

Materials such as Western Red Cedar, Douglas Fir, and Black Slate were chosen in order to contextualize the region and merge old and new building methods.

 

  Using a palette of volumes, walls, and materials the house was designed using 5 different sliding applications; splicing traditional and contemporary textures while reflecting the natural environment, and transforming the house into a sculptural object.
       
     

Using a palette of volumes, walls, and materials the house was designed using 5 different sliding applications; splicing traditional and contemporary textures while reflecting the natural environment, and transforming the house into a sculptural object.

  The interiors are designed to connect the interior to the exterior. Large columns support large expanses of roof to mimic the trees and their horizontal canopies, slate walls carry through the house from interior to exterior and back out again, and water flows from a man made creek up and around the house.        
       
     

The interiors are designed to connect the interior to the exterior. Large columns support large expanses of roof to mimic the trees and their horizontal canopies, slate walls carry through the house from interior to exterior and back out again, and water flows from a man made creek up and around the house. 

 

_MG_1047.jpg
       
     
_MG_1107.jpg
       
     
roof plan.jpg
       
     
1st floor.jpg
       
     
2nd Floor.jpg
       
     
M robertson creek section [Converted].jpg
       
     
section house close up.jpg